Buster Brown Came To Dublin Too!

Frozen In Time:  It is February 6, 1911, according to the writing on the old photo,* and the scene depicted is almost unbelievable for those of us living in small-town Texas of the 21st century.  Is there anything or anyone who can draw this type of a crowd today?  Any little boy who advertises clothing, socks, and shoes?

If you will look very carefully to the right side of the photo, you will see a ladder. At the top of the ladder, on the overhang , Buster and Tige are standing.

If you will look very carefully to the right side of the photo, you will see a ladder. At the top of the ladder, on the overhang , Buster and Tige are standing.  According to the photo, you are looking at East Blackjack Street.

I told you a few weeks ago that Buster Brown and his sidekick doggie, Tige, once visited the town of Comanche. Well, not to be outdone, Dublin historian, Janella Hendon, reminded me that old Buster was once a visitor in Dublin as well! In fact, the very famous duo did not ride into Comanche until over a year after they had visited Dublin.

 There aren’t many things about “the old days” to which I would want to return; however, to be able to capture the pre-television, pre-continuous news cycle, pre-jaded personalities that caused people of long ago to find fun and entertainment where they could…that, I believe we could all use in our lives today!

*Information from the Dublin Historical Museum

About Fredda Jones

Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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