I Remember Jerry Hulsey

I Remember Jerry Hulsey, and I’m thinking that a lot of you do as well!  Now, before I start let me say that Jerry was a very controversial teacher…but then so was I so I’m not going there! LOL

Where I am going is to the fact that controversial or not, Jerry knew his English grammar, and he was ruthless in his teaching of it. He also taught “back in the day” when parents didn’t challenge every subpar grade and when his red pen was indeed the king.

Enter I into his sophomore English class…with my nose a little in the air you understand because I was the writer of the class…I was the A+ queen of the essay. Anything else was just unacceptable, of course! And, the year in English (Don’t ask me about math!) went pretty much as had all of my English classes, including my writing grades.

One day Jerry, who was Mr. Hulsey back then, made a very, very easy assignment. We were to write a story, a mystery story that I should have been able to write without even thinking about it. In fact, I suppose I did write it without thinking, and I thought I had written a masterpiece; I truly did!

Now, fast forward a couple of days to the day when Mr. Hulsey put those stories back on our desks and imagine with me if you will my surprise, my shock, my complete horror when I saw a Great….Big….Huge…Red…F on the top of my story. AN F!!!

“Mr. Hulsey, how can I have an F?”

“What is the automatic grade on a paper that contains a fragment?”

“An F, but I didn’t write a fragment!”

“I think you’d better read that again.”

Now, before I go any farther, I have to tell you that this was obviously one of the best lessons any teacher ever taught me in all of my years of education because I have never forgotten the exact words I wrote, the words I had believed were so perfect.

“At last she had it. The perfect solution!”

And, sure enough, there was the glaring, awful fragment that bought me my first and only F I was ever to earn.

Today, I think of Jerry Hulsey every single time I break the rules of grammar as he called them, and I break them continuously on this website. In fact, there is a fragment in this very article, and….I like it, by golly! But I do understand Mr. Hulsey’s theory that “one must know the rules before he is allowed to break them.”

So…Mr. Husley…I do remember every single rule you ever taught…even if I do choose to break them today. I will say though that even I don’t quite have the nerve to end a sentence with a preposition, not quite yet, anyway!

P.S. Just in case you are wondering, I still believe that within the context of a mystery story my fragment sounded pretty perfect! LOL

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About Fredda Jones

Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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14 Responses to I Remember Jerry Hulsey

  1. John Scott says:

    This is in regards to the Jerry Hulsey story. It is strange what we remember from all of those years gone by. I missed going to Comanche to school by about a mile and a creek. I did attend at Van Dyke for two years, so that and family ties accounts for my association with some of those Comanche people.
    I know Fredda does not like responders rambling around and changing the main idea. I will get to the main reason for my comment. My eighth grade teacher in De Leon was named Alda Daniel and was known for being strict. We feared her wrath. However; to this day I understand most grammar rules and her influence is still there 50 something years later. How I use them might not always please her, but I do know them.
    Many years later, after I graduated from college and became a teacher, I encountered Mrs. Alda Daniel in De Leon. She wanted to know what I was doing and I told her. Slowly a smile appeared and she patted me on the shoulder. Now I wish I had told her that I used the knowledge she gave me when I was teaching and wrote for a textbook company. I was a little in awe of her still and am today. But thanks for everything, Mrs. Daniel.

    • Fredda Jones Fredda Jones says:

      You are so right, John. The teachers we remember and respect the most are those who actually were strict and who insisted that we learn. Thankfully, I had the time to grow up and understand that there were some that I should thank. Unfortunately, some were gone before I understood the need to do that.

      • jodi pyburn says:

        William Boyd in Math was that teacher for me! Scared the daylights out of me, but I learned more from him than any other math teacher I ever had.

        • Fredda Jones Fredda Jones says:

          William and I became great friends, but his was the only class I ever had where I never spoke a word unless I was invited to do so!! LOL

          • Harrell Gilbreath says:

            Hello Fredda , This is about Jerry Hulsey. Jerry grew up about a mile from our place in the Edna Hill community. Jim,Lois, and Jerry lived in the old ranch house my Grand parents built on the Home-Place on Resleys Creek. My dad was born in that house as well as my two older siblings, Loree and Tad. My Grandfather John Chesley Gilbreath and my Grandmother Lucy Cathlene Barbee Gilbreath raised a family of eight children there. The Hulseys were wonderful neighbors and Jerry was a bashful timid little boy about four years younger than I . Jim was one of my heroes. I thought next to my own father he was about the smartest man I knew. He always had time to explain something to you. Lois was a good deal younger than Jim and a beautiful woman with a beautiful smile. I left Edna Hill in 1961 when Jerry was still in High school I think. I heard Jim and Lois divorced and Jim went back to West Texas while Lois and Jerry stayed on the farm at Edna Hill. Don’t know what happened to Jerry or Lois. Heard stories, took them all with a grain of salt because I wasn’t there. I just remember an ideal family from a simpler time when I suppose innocence was a good friend. Sorry about the grammar. I was playing sports and showing Dairy cattle when I should have been paying more attention in English class.

  2. Mary Shafer Peacock says:

    I was so surprised to see the story about Jerry Hulsey. I went to school and graduated with Jerry in Dublin. I think I have seen him only twice in all the fifty years since we graduated. It is nice to find out a little bit about his life after high school!

    • Fredda Jones Fredda Jones says:

      So glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I am interested in your Peacock name. My husband had a great grand who was a Peacock.

      • My husband’s Peacocks descended from Ancel Peacock who came to Texas after the Civil War. His grandad had a cafe in Dublin in the 1940’s and was called “chicken” but was James Irvine. My husband’s mother was a Burks and born in old Cora. Do you know anything about your husband’s great grand? As a side note, my mom was born in Comanche county and is related to Sparks, Patton, Lesley, Fritz, and Brown families. She is very proud of her Aunt Fannie Brown who was a well known midwife, and her dad, Tom Sparks who was Santa Fe Railroad section foreman from the 1930’s through the 1960’s. This is probably too much info! We are proud of Comanche County roots as you can see!..

        • Fredda Jones Fredda Jones says:

          I love Comanche County roots as well! His great is Inex Peacock,and I believe she married a Kerley. She is buried in Comanche in Oakwood Cemetery.

        • jamie peacock lambert says:

          Mary and Fredda, I happen to also be a Peacock.Our heritage goes back to Georgia but my Peacock family lived in Throckmorton,Jayton,Aspermont in Stonewall County. My father was Kenneth Don Peacock,his sister,my aunt (still living) Glenda Peacock were the children of Braxton Bragg and Mary Peacock, B.B. was named after a general in the civil war, he had two brothers Horace and I think John founded the town of a now ghost town called Peacock Texas.I just happen to be in Stephenville restaurant last weekend and ate at Peacocks restaurant, met Steve Peacock who also say’s his family was origanilly from Ga. Most are now in Dublin.I have been doing research on the Peacocks for about a year now and I have so much more to share.

      • My husband’s Peacocks descended from Ancel Peacock who came to Texas after the Civil War. His grandad had a cafe in Dublin in the 1940’s and was called “chicken” but was James Irvine. My husband’s mother was a Burks and born in old Cora. Do you know anything about your husband’s great grand? As a side note, my mom was born in Comanche county and is related to Sparks, Patton, Lesley, Fritz, and Brown families. She is very proud of her Aunt Fannie Brown who was a well known midwife, and her dad, Tom Sparks who was Santa Fe Railroad section foreman from the 1930’s-70s.

  3. I will see if I can find anything about an Inex Peacock in my husband’s family. Unusual
    name.

  4. Judy Hicks Kreins says:

    I miss Comaznche High. I was in the last graduating class from the “old High School.” I remember constantly arguing with Mr. Hulsey or trying to ask questions to confuse him. Confession time… I was furiously trying to get homework for another class or writing a letter and Mr Hulsey would ask if I was paying attention or working on something else. I would point blank say ” I’m taking notes!” I would hold my paper up glare at him and ask if he wanted to see it. Only class I ever did this in. I asked Gos to forgive me for lying too.

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