Native American Hiking Trail In The Works For Comanche

When your town’s name is Comanche, it only makes sense that residents promote the town’s Native American heritage, right?  That’s a big part of the plan for the new heritage center, and it is the entire plan for the hiking trail that skirts the Comanche City Park. Today, I walked that trail with Comanche Police Chief Bruce Bradshaw and his wife, Master Naturalist Gail Bradshaw, both of whom are actively involved in the plan to transform the trail built years ago by Cliff Conway and the boy scouts with whom he worked.

Just one spot on the trail...

Just one spot on the trail…

Here at United we will be bringing you news from the trail from time to time, but in a nutshell, the plan is to rebuild the trail as needed. Then, those working on the project will be planting native plants along the trail that would have been used by the Comanche for both medicinal and food purposes.  Each plant will also come with the proper signage, telling hikers both the name of the plant as well as its purpose.

At the head of the trail will be a large, state park quality map/sign that shows potential hikers what they will be seeing along the way, including the possibility for four legged critters and those who travel via a set of wings. Today, we were greeted by a beautiful cardinal and a very, very large skunk!

And You Wanted To Kill Those Briars!

Bruce Bradshaw, who is also a Master Naturalist, stopped to give me a lesson in native plants by using a piece of green briar.

Bruce Bradshaw, who is also a Master Naturalist, stopped to give me a lesson in native plants by using a piece of green briar.

Green Briars were actually a food source for the Comanche, the nutrients found in them similar to what we find today in asparagus.  I didn't quite have the nerve to chomp down on one!

Green briars were actually a food source for the Comanche, the nutrients found in them similar to what we find today in asparagus. I didn’t quite have the nerve to chomp down on one!

The trail will remain as rough as possible, with plants spaced so as to keep hikers entertained as they walk. Of course, the trail group is a part of Revitalize Comanche, Inc. who works to fund these types of projects. You can donate to the project by sending your check to Revitalize Comanche, Inc. P.O. Box 266 Comanche 76442, or you can pay online at revitalizecomanche.com.

As just as an aside, it was suggest to us recently that it would be very, very cool to hold canoe races…even mentioned how to fill Indian Creek for those races.  Lots of you are thinking outside the box these days!

About Fredda Jones

Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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