Over 75,000 Head Of Cattle Pass By Blanket, Texas

Maybe you had to have grown up on television westerns and cowboy lore to have a real interest in western heritage, cattle drives, and Indian battles. I don’t know. One thing I do know, however, is that even I can forget that all of that once lived right here in Texas where today I sit and type. In fact, not too many years ago, the bawling of herds destined for northern markets would at times have played an accompaniment to the clickity clack of my computer keys on those long, hot Texas days.

Known to my family as Grandpa and Grandma Eoff (James Alexander and Gypsy Unora Welty Eoff, my great grandpatents), they came together from Boone County Arkansas with their parents during the 1860s and early 1870s. They settled in Blanket in 1874- Clint Tunnell, Blanket

Known to my family as Grandpa and Grandma Eoff (James Alexander and Gypsy Unora Welty Eoff, my great grandpatents), they came together from Boone County Arkansas with their parents during the 1860s and early 1870s. They settled in Blanket in 1874- Clint Tunnell, Blanket

In 1881, Robert Thomas Hill, who would go on to become the Father of Geology in Texas, was one of the editors of the Comanche Chief. On June 25 of that year it was written in the Chief that Blanket was a thriving settlement, located fifteen miles from Comanche on the line of Comanche and Brown counties.

“It has a building and is surrounded by large agriculture community. We could not help noticing that there is a good location here for a gin and a blacksmith shop.”

Blanket was obviously located on the “cattle drive trail” as well.

“Mr. Beckham the gentlemanly storekeeper, informed us that some 75,000 head of cattle had already passed by this year.”

And since the article was written in June of ’81, there were still six months left for cattle to pass by that year!

“The crops in the vicinity are simply magnificent: corn, cotton, millet, rye, sorghum, and others…”

Don’t you just love these peeps into days gone by in Texas?

Note: Thankfully, Dora Nabers Greene and daughter, Nannie Little, kept scrapbooks and thankfully, I ended up with those books. It makes my finding these tidbits much, much easier!

About Fredda Jones

Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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