• Promoting Small Town Texas Can Be Done!!

    TEXAS PHOTOIt’s hard…it’s time consuming…and it costs some money…BUT it is absolutely possible to promote your small town Texas, its businesses, and its events!! OF COURSE, you have to use the internet; OF COURSE, you have to use social media;  OF COURSE, you have to use main stream media, and OF COURSE, you have to have a great idea.

    However, before all of these very necessary ingredients are added to the mix, you first have to have people who are 100% willing to “buy into” whatever their town, their people, their businesses,  and their events need, and to be very honest this is the ingredient that is so often lacking in small town anywhere. It was not, however, lacking last fall when the Comanche County Historical Museum held its arrowhead unveiling and fund raiser…not at all, and it paid off in both attendance and dollars donated to the museum.

    Of course, the museum had a great idea considering that many people are fascinated by arrowheads and all that go with the study of Native American culture. Couple that with the fact that people salivate at just the mention of Henry Adcock pies, and you have a whale of an idea right off of the bat.

    Next, the museum had to let the masses know about the event so members used the Internet, all types of social media, mainstream media, snail mail, and email. In fact they spent untold hours on these very things as a way to market their event, using Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook.

    And then…they worked, and worked, and worked, building the new display, moving cases, chairs, tables, etc. to make room for the huge crowd that they expected. Of course, the museum is terribly fortunate to have board members who possess that last ingredient…the buying into factor…and who are willing to go way, way above and beyond to make their events special.

    Tommy Patterson not only crafted this knife which brought in big bucks for the museum, but he dressed the part as well.

    Tommy Patterson not only crafted this knife which brought in big bucks for the museum, but he dressed the part as well.

    Chris McNutt interacted with visitors, teaching Native American history and lore.

    Chris McNutt interacted with visitors, teaching Native American history and lore.

    Hank LaRowe, long time fan of Indian lore, shows off his double trailer headdress. Hank is ¼ Delaware Indian and made what he is wearing himself.

    Hank LaRowe, long time fan of Indian lore, showed off his double trailer headdress and answered questions.  Hank is ¼ Delaware Indian and made what he wore himself.

    As I said, it can be done. If 10 people (on a good day) can make something like this happen successfully, can you just imagine what an entire town who believed in itself could do? And I’m really not even talking about just events here…just concentrating on the positives…just working to get more positives…and then telling the world about those positives. Again, it CAN be done, and if you don’t believe me, just ask the folks of tiny little Hico, Texas! Somehow, someway, they’ve managed to do the impossible, haven’t they?

    About Fredda Jones

    Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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