Viola Humpries, Southern Baptist Missionary From Dublin, Texas

CHINAWritten by Mary Yantis

Viola Humpries of Dublin, Texas was a Southern Baptist missionary who served in China for sixteen years. She returned to Texas on June 21, 1937, and was met by friends as well as her family who had moved to Albany during her absence.

Within the space of the next month, Viola returned to Dublin two separate times. Once she visited the First Baptist Church where she found people that she knew very well. She expressed her appreciation for the support she received from the church as well as from the newspaper and KFPL (Kind Friends Please Listen) Radio. KFPL was at that time the largest radio station in the area and was owned and operated by C.C. Baxter, who also did the broadcasting.

The church, the newspaper, and the radio station kept Viola’s story before the people of the Dublin area while whe was serving; this added to prayer support, money support, and the support of missions around the world in general.

Before leaving, Ms. Humpries gave a report of what China had been like when she left.

Viola also returned to Dublin to attend the town’s big reunion where, believe it or not, there were 5,000 in attendance!

There are several letters that were reproduced in the Dublin Progress. If you would like to do your own research on Viola, these can be found on microfilm in the Dublin Public Library.

Viola Humpries is buried in the Dublin Cemetery.

About Fredda Jones

Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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