• Where Were Hebron & Creamer In Comanche County?

    Lewis Hardy Creamer and Laura Magdelene Taylor Creamer

    Lewis Hardy Creamer and Laura Magdelene Taylor Creamer

    Are you like me? You’ve listened to an older generation most of your life as those people talk about long gone communities, and yet you have no real idea where they were located, right?

    That’s the way I was recently about what I thought was the community of Hebron. As it turns out (according to Missy Jones), I was wrong. Hebron wasn’t a community at all; it was a school, a school that served the community of Creamer…go figure on that one!

    So where was the Hebron school located? And where was Creamer, the community it served? It’s really very simple….well, it is once you know. :)

    To get to Creamer, take Highway 36 out of Comanche toward Gustine.

    Be watching for CR 318 to your left.

    Be watching for CR 318 to your left. Take that dirt road just to get off of the main road.

    Stop immediately and look to your left. In that corner, fronting Highway 36, is where the Creamer store stood, once owned by a Creamer and later by Brady Cotney, father of Peggy Gore.

    Stop immediately and look to your left. In that corner, fronting Highway 36, is where the Creamer store stood, once owned by the Creamer family and later by Brady Cotney, father of Peggy Gore. In the back of the store building, Grady Cotney operated a barbershop.

    Since we were already on CR 318, we drove on down a 1/2 mile or so to view the old Hardy and Maggie Creamer homeplace, according to Missy Jones, a 1/2 dugout.

    Since we were already on CR 318, we drove on down a 1/2 mile or so to view the old Hardy and Maggie Creamer homeplace (on the right), according to Missy Jones, a 1/2 dugout home.

    If you will turn around on 318 and cross back over 36, you will find the site of the Creamer depot, closer to the road than what this home is today.

    If you will turn around on 318 and cross back over 36, you will find the site of the Creamer depot, closer to the road than what this home is today.

    Since Highway 36 was once the tracks for the Cottonbelt railroad, the depot would have been located very close to the road. Missy Jones remembers her parents telling her that young couples used to take their buggies after church on Sundays and go out to watch the train come in!

    There was apparently a picket fence around at least part of the depot yard.

    “One time when Mama and Daddy were courting, Daddy was trying to open the gate in the picket fence for Mama to walk through. The depot man, as Mama called him, called out, ‘Mr. Will, why don’t you just pick her up and sot her over it?'”

    Looking back across Highway 36 and to your right you will see the site of the Creamer church houses. I know for sure that there was a Methodist church and a Free Will Baptist church. There was also a tabernacle, shared by all churches.

    Looking back across Highway 36 and to your right you will see the site of the Creamer church houses. I know for sure that there was a Methodist church and a Free Will Baptist church. There was also a tabernacle, shared by all churches.

    When you've finished looking, head toward Gustine once again. Be watching for CR 222 to your right. As soon as you've passed it, you will see a creek ahead. This is Salt Branch.

    When you’ve finished looking, head toward Gustine once again. Be watching for CR 222 to your right. As soon as you’ve passed it, you will see a creek ahead. This is Salt Branch.

    Missy could not remember which side of the creek the Hebron school sat on, just that it was on your left if you are driving toward Gustine. It was Comanche County school district #54. Today, a beautiful meadow marks the spot.

    Missy could not remember which side of the creek the Hebron school sat on, just that it was on your left if you are driving toward Gustine. It was Comanche County school district #54. Today, beautiful meadows mark the spot. At this point, you will be about 6.6 miles out of Comanche.

    And how many times have you blithely driven from Comanche to Gustine, never dreaming that once there was an entire community with its own train station between the two towns? Amazing, isn’t it?

    (In 1992, Alton Mercer drew a map of the area and plotted who lived where. This can be viewed inside the Comanche County Historical Museum should you be interested.)

    About Fredda Jones

    Fredda Davis Jones was raised “in the country” in Comanche County and learned very early that creativity and innovation are traits that can flourish even in small-town Texas and that with enough effort, indeed nothing is impossible, including being married to the same man for over 40 years! Rickey and Fredda have 2 children, 5 grandchildren, and a crazy life that includes sitting in the bleachers several times a week. The rest of her time is spent creating great content for texansunited.com and marketing small-town Texas.
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    2 Responses to Where Were Hebron & Creamer In Comanche County?

    1. Vickie Harvick says:

      I have the abstracts to Josiah Creamer’s home place. The Cotney’s bought part of their place. I know where Josiah Creamer’s house was. It stood abandoned for many years before being torn down. Rodney Stephens now owns the property that it was on and my grandparents place, not the one on the highway, but the one up the road from the Creamer place where my aunt Doris told me the Heborn school was. The roads have changed some. The road my mom grew up on is not the same now as it was when she was growing up. It use to go straight from her house to the dug out. I will ask her about the depot. When I was growing up there was a building up the road from my grand parents that looked like a depot. I don’t know if that was the original location or if it was moved in later. People rented it to live in when my mom was a young. The Lonnie Craig’s rented at one time. Florence Stephens may still remember a lot about these communities. She remembered holding my mother when my mother was a baby. The Cotney’s also had a store up the road from Josiah Creamers, a blacksmith shop, and a barber shop. My granddad was Brady. He and his brother Grady were both barbers. Grady did more barbering than my granddad. Grady was married to Elton McDonald’s mom. He took typhoid in their early marriage and died. They had no children. I just had a conversation with my mom about this a few days ago. My mom and my Aunt Doris may be able to tell you a lot more about this area. They both still have good memories. My mom says she does not like to watch the Waltons on TV because it reminds her to much of her childhood and the depression.

    2. Missy Jones says:

      I do remember Hardy and Maggie Creamer. look at the picture of them standing by their house. this house at one time had beadboard ceilings, and was very nice. Maggie was so sweet and pretty. her hair was braided, and see the print dress she is wearing. She had a sister living in the community, a Mrs. Bolen, and Mr. and Mrs. Bolen had a son named Arlie B. Bolen. Hey, I was just a little girl, but I knew a sweet lady when I saw one. I appreciate getting to ride with Fredda the day she took these pictures. My brother-in-law, Alton Mercer was so knowledgeable about Hebron and Creamer. He went to school at Hebron school (county school # 54) until he was ready for high school, when he and his brother Walter tranferred to Comanche. Come by the Comanche Historical Museum. in the community room (Creamer, Pettit, Hasse, etc) Alton’s map is hanging, which he drew about the people and places from Comanche to Gustine, along the Cotton Belt railroad. We have handouts for you of his map and information.

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